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New Faculty

The Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences (E&PS) welcomes several new faculty as part of our new Global Change Science Initiative. These faculty join existing Global Change faculty whose research focuses on the fundamental Earth Science problems critical to understanding global change.

Anand Gnanadesikan
Assistant Professor


Academic Background 
1994 Ph.D MIT




Research Interests:

Physical Circulation, Biogeochemical Cycling, Climate Modeling
Research Website: http://www.gfdl.noaa.gov/anand-gnanadesikan-home-page
http://blaustein.eps.jhu.edu/~gnana

BENJAMIN PASSEY
Assistant Professor

Academic Background

2007 Ph.D University of Utah
2004 M.S. University of Utah
2001 B.S. University of Utah

 Research Interests

Geochemistry, Paleoecology, Paleoclimate

Research Summary

I am interested in the history of, and interrelationships among, Earth's climate, ecology, and geochemistry.I utilize geochemical and ecological tools to help extract and interpret information from modern environments and from the geological record. Air, waters, plants, animals, and soils are routinely 'stuffed' into isotope ratio mass spectrometers as a part of these pursuits. Fieldwork and modeling are also important components of my research approach. Research Website: http://www.bhpassey.net

 
NAOMI LEVIN
Assistant Professor

Academic Background

2008 Ph.D. University of Utah
2002 M.S. University of Arizona
2000 B.A., B.S. Stanford University

 

Research Interests

Sedimentary Geology, Stable Isotope Ecology

Research Summary

My research centers on understanding how landscapes and terrestrial organisms respond to past climate change. I primarily use stable isotopic records to study interactions between mammals, vegetation, and climate in past ecosystems. Modern analog studies are an important part of this research; by looking carefully at today's climatic, ecological and geochemical processes, it's possible to expand the utility of paleo-environmental archives.
Research website:http://www.nlevin.net

BENJAMIN ZAITCHIK
Assistant Professor

Academic Background

2006 PhD Yale University
2001 MS Cornell University
1998 AB Harvard University

Research Interests

Climate dynamics, surface hydrology

Research Summary

My research is directed at understanding, managing, and coping with climatic and hydrologic variability. Understanding variability requires examination of the natural processes that drive climate and surface change.Managing variability relates to our ability to control anthropogenic influences on climate and hydrology at the local, regional, and global scales. Coping with variability includes improved forecast systems and methods of risk assessment. In each of these areas of research I employ a combination of observation both in situ and remotely sensed and numerical modeling techniques.
Email: zaitchik@jhu.edu

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