Department News Archive


Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition

Treatise on Geophysics, 2nd Edition
The Treatise on Geophysics Second Edition, including Peter Olson's volume 8 "Core Dynamics," is scheduled for release on June 12. Learn more.


Why Do We Care So Much About Mars?

Why Do We Care So Much About Mars?
The JHU Gazette interviewed Assistant Professor Kevin Lewis for an article on Mars. Lewis works with images and topography of sedimentary rocks to evaluate the Martian landscape and geological features, all in an effort to determine the planet’s past climate. Read the full article here.


Earth’s Hottest June Follows Hottest May. The New Normal?

This June was the warmest one since record keeping began in 1880, a NOAA center reports. Same was true for May. It’s more evidence the planet is heating up, climate scientists say. Read the article in The Christian Science Monitor.


GECS Student Justin Falcone Awarded Truman Scholarship

GECS Student Justin Falcone Awarded Truman Scholarship
Junior Justin Falcone, who has dedicated his personal and academic pursuits to studying and addressing the global implications of climate change, was recently named one of 59 recipients of the prestigious Harry S. Truman Scholarship. The awards are given annually to U.S. college undergraduates with demonstrated leadership potential and a commitment to public service.


Ozone Thinning Has Changed Ocean Circulation

In a paper published in this week’s issue of the journal Science, Darryn Waugh and his team show that subtropical intermediate waters in the southern oceans have become “younger” as the upwelling, circumpolar waters have gotten “older”—changes that are consistent with the fact that surface winds have strengthened as the ozone layer has thinned.


Mineral Named in Honor of Prof. David Veblen

Mineral Named in Honor of  Prof. David Veblen
Veblenite is found in Newfoundland and Labrador and acknowledges the accomplishments of a distinguished professor in earth and planetary sciences.


The Loss of a Beloved Faculty Member, Lawrence (Lawrie) Hardie

The Loss of a Beloved Faculty Member, Lawrence (Lawrie) Hardie
On December 17, 2013, the Johns Hopkins University Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences lost a venerable and beloved faculty member, Lawrence “Lawrie” Alexander Hardie, professor emeritus of geochemistry and sedimentology. For nearly 50 years, Lawrie Hardie inspired students and colleagues at Johns Hopkins through his devotion to science, his personal integrity, and his commitment to the welfare of others.


Clued In

Clued In
E&PS paleoclimatologists rely on a variety of tools—from isotopes to ocean temperature—to parse the past in order to shed light on Earth’s future. Read the article in Arts & Sciences magazine.


Warmer, Fresher, Worrisome

Warmer, Fresher, Worrisome
E&PS Chair Thomas Haine has been working to monitor and understand how water flows out of the Arctic, especially freshwater. He warns that major changes in the Arctic ice cap could be part of a chain of effects that could alter ocean composition, Atlantic currents, and the rate of global climate change. Read the article […]