Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information is available on the SIS website.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

FYS: Environmental Poisons
AS.001.129 (01)

An exploration of the occurrence and potential effects of poisons in the environment, from naturally occurring ones such as arsenic to those that may be introduced by mankind such as nuclear waste.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 9:00AM - 9:50AM
  • Instructor: Sverjensky, Dimitri
  • Room: Olin 204  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the Environment
AS.211.231 (01)

Without Amazonia, global warming could reach levels that threaten life on the planet. Yet, in an era of deforestation and climate change, Amazonia itself might be on the verge of disappearance, with disastrous consequences for the world. This course proposes interdisciplinary perspectives on Amazonia through a range of works drawn from history, anthropology, archeology, environmental studies, literature, and the arts. We’ll look at texts by European travelers and missionaries who contributed to the paradoxical image of Amazonia as a “virgin paradise” or a “green hell”; scientific studies and artists’ depictions of the region’s flora and fauna; the often-overlooked history of human occupation of the region; and projects to colonize, develop, or conserve the world’s largest tropical forest. What importance does Amazonia hold for Latin American and global geopolitics? How do art and literature, including indigenous writings, create, reinforce, or deconstruct clichés about the region? What alternative futures for our planet can Amazonia help us to imagine?

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Miguel Bedran, Marina (Marina)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Guided Tour: The Planets
AS.270.114 (01)

An introduction to planetary science and planetary exploration primarily for non-science majors. A survey of concepts from astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics applied to the study of the solar system.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Kevin, Sing, David Kent
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 30/110
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Natural Hazards
AS.270.128 (01)

We are all residents of the Earth. Do you want to know how we impact it and how it impacts us? This seminar provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the earth processes that can lead to natural hazards and their social and economic consequences. Topics include earthquakes, tsunamis, volcanoes, hurricanes, coastal flooding, and climate change. We will use real case studies to explore the science behind the occurrence of natural hazards, and the role of human decision-making in turning a hazard into a disaster. Throughout the course, we will have class discussions on the assigned readings, documentaries, and podcasts.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Saberi, Atousa
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/15
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

The Grandeur of You & The Universe
AS.270.129 (01)

A common question that the scientific community is confronted with is “Why do I care?” or “How does this relate to and affect me?”. We will address these questions by inquiring and exploring where each one of us fit in the grand scheme of the cosmos and its exploration, centered around themes and concepts fundamental in Earth, planetary, and space sciences (EPSS). Using various creative mediums, you will learn to understand and narrate how you, all parts of your identity relate to the story of the universe. This class will allow you to master the fundamentals in EPSS, appreciate and relate to scientific discoveries, understand how to be responsible future scientists and citizens cognizant of broad scientific impacts, and develop and enhance various skills to be able to understand and communicate science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Angappan, Regupathi
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Ecology
AS.270.202 (01)

Ecology is the study of organisms and their environment. This course focuses on the patterns of distribution and abundance of organisms. Topics include population dynamics and regulation, competition, predation, host-parasite interactions, patterns of species diversity, community succession, the flow of energy and matter through ecosystems. We will also discuss the role of natural and human disturbances in shaping communities.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Avolio, Meghan Lynn
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/45
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE, BEHB-BIOBEH

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Kelly, Rebecca E
  • Room: Krieger 108  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/24
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR

Mineralogy
AS.270.222 (01)

Introduction to the classification, crystallography, and physical properties of minerals. Weekly lab topics include field identification, crystal morphology and symmetry, optical microscopy and Raman spectroscopy. One field trip to the Smithsonian National Museum of History and Research Archives is planned.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: WF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 3:00PM - 6:00PM
  • Instructor: Wicks, June K
  • Room: Olin 204 Olin 204
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Oceans & Atmospheres
AS.270.224 (01)

A broad survey of the Earth’s oceans and atmospheres, and their role in the environment and climate. Topics covered include waves, tides, ocean and atmosphere circulation, weather systems, tornadoes and hurricanes, El Niño, and climate change. For science and engineering majors

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 1:30PM - 2:20PM
  • Instructor: Gnanadesikan, Anand, Haine, Thomas
  • Room: Olin 304  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/32
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Evolution and Development of the Vertebrates
AS.270.310 (01)

Modern vertebrates (animals with backbones) are the products of a more than 500-million-year evolutionary history. This course surveys that history and uses it to explore such core evolutionary concepts as adaptive radiation, convergence, extinction, homology, phylogenetic taxonomy, and tree thinking. Emphasis will be placed on the origins of the modern vertebrate fauna and how fossils are being integrated with developmental biology to better understand major transitions in the vertebrate body plan.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Bever, Gabriel S. (Gabriel)
  • Room: Olin 247  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/20
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-BIOBEH, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Conservation Biology
AS.270.317 (01)

In this course, students examine the meaning and implications of biodiversity with a focus on disciplines associated with conservation biology, wildlife conservation and wildlife management, including taxonomy, genetics, small population biology, chemical and restoration ecology, and marine biology. This includes exploring how conservation biology differs from other natural sciences in theory and in application. Students learn the major threats to biodiversity and what natural and social science methods and alternatives are used to mitigate, stop, or reverse these threats. The course also includes the economic and cultural tradeoffs associated with each conservation measure at the global, national, regional, and local levels. One required field trip.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 12:00PM - 1:15PM
  • Instructor: Burgess, Jerry
  • Room: Olin 204  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/16
  • PosTag(s): BEHB-BIOBEH, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Ocean Biogeochemical Cycles
AS.270.323 (01)

This course will examine the cycling of trace chemicals in the ocean, consider what we can learn from the distributions of these chemicals about the ocean circulation, and ocean ecosystems. Topics covered will include oceanic biological productivity, open water cycling of nutrients and oxygen, ocean acidification and sediment cycling.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 3:00PM - 3:50PM
  • Instructor: Gnanadesikan, Anand, Haine, Thomas
  • Room: Olin 204  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/20
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Metamorphic Petrology
AS.270.345 (01)

Introduction to metamorphic geology and the concepts on which it is built. Ideas and techniques that underpin metamorphic petrology are introduced. Focus is on utility of metamorphic geology in understanding petrogenesis crustal processes and plate tectonics. Local field trip(s) to explore the metamorphic geology of the Baltimore region. Recommended course background: AS.270.220 and AS.270.221, or instructor permission

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 1:30PM - 2:45PM
  • Instructor: Viete, Daniel R
  • Room:    
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Structural Geology Seminar
AS.270.346 (01)

Seminar class on fundamentals of structural geology. Involves weekly readings/practical exercises on: (1) rock mechanics and deformation processes; (2) commonly-encountered deformation products/structures; (3) deformation style and associated fabrics/textures/structure; (4) metamorphism and deformation; (5) techniques for describing and measuring structures; (6) interpretation of structural data on maps and cross-sections; (7) approaches for inferring large-scale structure from limited data, and (8) methods for visualizing and analyzing structure. Recommended course background: AS.270.220, or instructor permission.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 3:00PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Viete, Daniel R
  • Room: Olin 347  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Sedimentary Geology
AS.270.350 (01)

Sedimentary rocks are the historical records of the Earth, documenting climate change, mass extinctions, and the evolution of life. This course will provide an introduction to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rocks. Focus is placed on linking physical observations to the ancient environments in which sedimentary rocks once formed. Fundamental tools for interpreting the sedimentary rock record, such as depositional models, geochronology, and chemostratigraphy will be reviewed. Two 1-day weekend field trips will occur over the course of the semester. There will also be weekly 1-hour labs. Lab and field trip times will be determined in the first week of class. Graduate and advanced undergraduate level. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.220 or instructor permission.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM, W 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Smith, Emily (Emmy)
  • Room: Olin 204 Olin 204
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Stellar and Planetary Waves
AS.270.409 (01)

The course will provide an overview of the major types of oscillatory motions and waves observed in the interiors of stars and planets as well as in oceans on the Earth and planetary atmospheres. This will involve not just purely fluid mechanical waves but also waves caused due to magnetic fields and their interaction with conducting fluids in the interior of planets and stars. Examples are acoustic waves, Rossby waves, Alfven waves, Magneto-Coriolis waves etc. Though the course will provide a brief overview/recap of basic fluid mechanics concepts, it is not designed to be a substitute for a fundamental fluid mechanics course. Fundamentals of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) will be introduced. Recommended preparation includes knowledge of fundamentals of fluid mechanics (courses: AS.270.425. Earth and Planetary Fluids. or EN.530.327. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics or equivalent) and familiarity with basics of electromagnetism (at the level of AS.171.101. General Physics: Physical Science Major I). If unsure, contact the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Barik, Ankit
  • Room: Olin 346  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Stellar and Planetary Waves
AS.270.409 (02)

The course will provide an overview of the major types of oscillatory motions and waves observed in the interiors of stars and planets as well as in oceans on the Earth and planetary atmospheres. This will involve not just purely fluid mechanical waves but also waves caused due to magnetic fields and their interaction with conducting fluids in the interior of planets and stars. Examples are acoustic waves, Rossby waves, Alfven waves, Magneto-Coriolis waves etc. Though the course will provide a brief overview/recap of basic fluid mechanics concepts, it is not designed to be a substitute for a fundamental fluid mechanics course. Fundamentals of magnetohydrodynamics (MHD) will be introduced. Recommended preparation includes knowledge of fundamentals of fluid mechanics (courses: AS.270.425. Earth and Planetary Fluids. or EN.530.327. Introduction to Fluid Mechanics or equivalent) and familiarity with basics of electromagnetism (at the level of AS.171.101. General Physics: Physical Science Major I). If unsure, contact the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Barik, Ankit
  • Room: Olin 145  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 12/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planetary Surface Processes
AS.270.410 (01)

This course explores processes that influence the evolution of planetary surfaces, including impact cratering, tectonics, volcanism, weathering, and sediment transport. These processes manifest themselves as structural deformation of planetary crusts due to loading by volcanoes, formation of craters by asteroid impacts, modification of surfaces by flowing landslides, rivers and glaciers, and the accumulation and transport of sand in dune fields on various planets. Emphasis is on the relationship to similar Earth processes, and the integrated geologic histories of the terrestrial planets, satellites, and asteroids. The focus will be on developing a physical understanding of these processes to interpret the surface characteristics and evolution of planets, satellites, asteroids, and comets from both qualitative assessments and quantitative measurements obtained from spacecraft data. A key component of the class will be the interpretation of these observations from recent and current planetary missions to the Moon, Mars, and other terrestrial bodies. Recommended Course Background: A sound knowledge of Calculus and Introductory Physics, and some prior knowledge of Earth and/or Planetary Science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: TTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM
  • Instructor: Lewis, Kevin
  • Room: Olin 204  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Solar System Magnetic Fields:Generation,Signatures, and Consequences
AS.270.430 (01)

Magnetic fields are generated in stars and other astrophysical objects and permeate the universe in an astonishing range of intensities and physical systems. This course focuses on magnetic fields in our solar system from the Sun and interplanetary space to planets and smaller bodies with extrapolation to exoplanetary systems. We survey how magnetic fields are generated, modified, and measured and examine their role in accelerating and trapping penetrating radiation as well as the consequences they have for airless surfaces and planetary atmospheres and habitability. Lectures and class discussion of seminal papers provide a topical overview and student research presentations allow greater exploration of topics of interest to each individual. Recommended Course Background: Basic knowledge of electricity and magnetism, elements of vector calculus; knowledge of planetary science is helpful but not required.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: W 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Anderson, Brian J (Brian)
  • Room:    
  • Status: Reserved Open
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Sustainability
AS.271.107 (01)

Humans are having such a massive impact on Earth systems that some call this the Anthropocene epoch. Should we consider this state of affairs progress or catastrophe? How to we find a sustainable path to the future? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the principles and practice of sustainability, exploring such issues as population, pollution, energy and natural resources, biodiversity, food, justice, and climate change through the lens of systems thinking. Course open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. Seniors by instructor permission only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MW 3:00PM - 4:15PM
  • Instructor: Kelly, Rebecca E
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/60
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Climate and Health
AS.271.311 (01)

This course will examine the impact of climate variability and change on human health and disease, including the adverse health effects related to extreme heat, air quality, nutrition, waterborne infections, insect-borne diseases, and exposure to storms and floods. Adaptation and mitigation strategies, including the health “co-benefits”, will also be examined

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Waugh, Darryn, Zaitchik, Benjamin
  • Room: Olin 145  
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Research Design
AS.271.399 (01)

This course supports students in the design of their senior capstone project, including crafting a suitable research question, identifying appropriate methodologies, and writing a formal project proposal.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times:
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room:    
  • Status: Approval Required
  • Seats Available: 3/5
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Environmental Ethics
AS.271.401 (01)

Environmental Ethics is a philosophical discipline that examines the moral relationship between humans and the natural environment. For individuals and societies, it can help structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Beginning with a comprehensive analysis of their own values, students will explore complex ethical questions, philosophical paradigms and real-life case studies through readings, films and seminar discussions. Traditional ethical theories, including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics will be examined and applied. Environmental moral worldviews, ranging from anthropocentric to ecocentric perspectives, will be critically evaluated. Organized debates will help students strengthen their ability to deconstruct and assess ethical arguments and to communicate viewpoints rooted in ethical principles. Students will apply ethical reasoning skills to an examination of contemporary environmental issues including, among others, biodiversity conservation, environmental justice, climate change, and overpopulation. Students will also develop, defend and apply their own personal environmental ethical framework. A basic understanding of modern environmental history and contemporary environmental issues is required. Prior experience with philosophy and ethics is not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: T 1:30PM - 4:00PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room: Olin 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR

Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis
AS.271.403 (01)

This course provides students with a broad introduction to US environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA, RCRA, and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of this course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the proper perspective. This course is taught in conjunction with an identical graduate course. All students will be expected to perform at a graduate level.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: M 6:00PM - 8:45PM
  • Instructor: Monopolis, Alexios Nicolaos
  • Room: Olin 304  
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/21
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR

Planets, Life and the Universe
AS.360.339 (01)

This multidisciplinary course explores the origins of life, planet formation, Earth's evolution, extrasolar planets, habitable zones, life in extreme environments, the search for life in the Universe, space missions, and planetary protection. Recommended Course Background: Three upper level (300+) courses in sciences (Biophysics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Math, or Computer Science)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Days/Times: MWF 11:00AM - 11:50AM
  • Instructor: Diruggiero, Jocelyne
  • Room:    
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/45
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.001.129 (01)FYS: Environmental PoisonsW 9:00AM - 9:50AMSverjensky, DimitriOlin 204
 
AS.211.231 (01)Planet Amazonia: Culture, History, and the EnvironmentW 1:30PM - 4:00PMMiguel Bedran, Marina (Marina) 
 
AS.270.114 (01)Guided Tour: The PlanetsTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMLewis, Kevin, Sing, David Kent 
 
AS.270.128 (01)Natural HazardsTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMSaberi, Atousa 
 
ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.129 (01)The Grandeur of You & The UniverseTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAngappan, Regupathi 
 
AS.270.202 (01)Introduction to EcologyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMAvolio, Meghan Lynn 
 
ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMKelly, Rebecca EKrieger 108
 
ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.222 (01)MineralogyWF 9:00AM - 9:50AM, W 3:00PM - 6:00PMWicks, June KOlin 204
Olin 204
AS.270.224 (01)Oceans & AtmospheresMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMGnanadesikan, Anand, Haine, ThomasOlin 304
 
ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.310 (01)Evolution and Development of the VertebratesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBever, Gabriel S. (Gabriel)Olin 247
 
BEHB-BIOBEH, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.317 (01)Conservation BiologyMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMBurgess, JerryOlin 204
 
BEHB-BIOBEH, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.323 (01)Ocean Biogeochemical CyclesMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMGnanadesikan, Anand, Haine, ThomasOlin 204
 
ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.345 (01)Metamorphic PetrologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMViete, Daniel R 
 
AS.270.346 (01)Structural Geology SeminarM 3:00PM - 4:00PMViete, Daniel ROlin 347
 
AS.270.350 (01)Sedimentary GeologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PM, W 3:00PM - 4:15PMSmith, Emily (Emmy)Olin 204
Olin 204
AS.270.409 (01)Stellar and Planetary WavesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMBarik, AnkitOlin 346
 
AS.270.409 (02)Stellar and Planetary WavesTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMBarik, AnkitOlin 145
 
AS.270.410 (01)Planetary Surface ProcessesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLewis, KevinOlin 204
 
AS.270.430 (01)Solar System Magnetic Fields:Generation,Signatures, and ConsequencesW 3:00PM - 4:15PMAnderson, Brian J (Brian) 
 
AS.271.107 (01)Introduction to SustainabilityMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKelly, Rebecca E 
 
AS.271.311 (01)Climate and HealthM 1:30PM - 4:00PMWaugh, Darryn, Zaitchik, BenjaminOlin 145
 
AS.271.399 (01)Research DesignMonopolis, Alexios Nicolaos 
 
AS.271.401 (01)Environmental EthicsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304
 
INST-PT, ENVS-MINOR
AS.271.403 (01)Environmental Policymaking and Policy AnalysisM 6:00PM - 8:45PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304
 
INST-AP, INST-CP, ENVS-MINOR
AS.360.339 (01)Planets, Life and the UniverseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDiruggiero, Jocelyne 
 
BIOL-UL