Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

The Dynamic Earth Laboratory
AS.270.221 (01)

This course is a hands-on learning experience for introductory geological concepts and techniques using geological tools, such as mineral/rock samples, microscopes, and maps. Field trips are its essential part. The course is open to undergraduates at all levels; freshmen who wish to get their hands (and boots) dirty are encouraged to enroll.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI

Energy Resources in the Modern World
AS.270.305 (01)

This in-depth survey will inform students on the non-renewable and renewable energy resources of the world and the future prospects. Topics include petroleum, natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydroelectric, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and ocean energy. Global production, distribution, usage, and impacts of these resources will be discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: The Story of Earth
AS.270.111 (01)

The four and a half billion year story of Earth's global changes focusing on the co-evolution of Earth and Life.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE

Aqueous Geochemistry
AS.270.302 (01)

Modeling the chemistry of water-rock interactions from weathering and riverine development at Earth’s surface to hot springs at depth, fluids in subduction zones in Earth’s interior, and the ancient fluids preserved in fluid inclusions. Thermodynamic basis for the calculation of equilibria and irreversible chemical mass transfer involving minerals and aqueous species at low and high temperatures and pressures. The course culminates with practical examples of research interest to individual participants.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Geoscience Modeling
AS.270.307 (01)

An introduction to modern ways to interpret observations in the context of a conceptual model. Topics include model building, hypothesis testing, and inverse methods. Practical examples from geophysics, engineering, and medical physics will be featured.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

People and the Earth: The Science Behind Our Interactions
AS.270.125 (01)

This course is designed to introduce non-science students to the ways in which humans and the Earth interact. These interactions go in both directions, with Earth processes and materials affecting human society, and human activities altering the Earth. Topics include natural disasters, natural resources, and environmental issues rooted in geology; and they are examined from both a historical perspective and in the context of current events. Class time involves active learning and hands-on experiences. Course open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. Seniors by instructor permission only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology
AS.270.220 (01)

Basic concepts in geology, including plate tectonics; Earth’s internal structure; geologic time; minerals; formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; development of faults, folds and earthquakes; geomagnetism. Corequisite (for EPS Majors): AS.270.221; optional for others. The course is introductory and open to undergraduates at all levels; freshmen are encouraged to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/30
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE

Introduction to Global Environmental Change
AS.270.103 (01)

An introduction to the science behind global environmental issues. Earth systems, biogeochemical cycles, and the interrelationships between the living and nonliving world are explored, along with applications to climate change, biodiversity loss, and other issues of global significance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 63/110
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Cosmochemistry
AS.270.326 (01)

Students in this course will gain an understanding of the origin of various forms of matter in our Solar System and beyond, along with its evolution through geologic processes. Beginning with the concepts of nucleosynthesis and stellar evolution, this course will then cover the condensation of matter, meteoritics, and petrogenetic evolution of differentiated, rocky bodies (i.e. asteroids, the Moon, Mars). Evolution of matter in extra-Solar planetary systems (i.e. exoplanets) will also be broached. In lab we will examine thin sections of meteorites, lunar material, and terrestrial analogs - a field trip to the Smithsonian Meteorite Collection is planned. Graduate and advanced undergraduate-level students are encouraged, as are interdisciplinary students with an interest in planetary science.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planetary Exploration: Techniques and Data Analysis
AS.270.328 (01)

Have you ever wondered what it would be like if you could visit other planets and travel through the space? Students in this course will use state-of-the-art observational techniques in planetary exploration and actual spacecraft data from the Cassini mission to Saturn and the Mars Rover mission to solve problems in planetary science and design a space exploration mission. Important planetary properties, such as atmospheric composition and interior composition of a planet, will be studied using remote sensing and in situ data. Recent discoveries about exoplanets will be integrated into course activities. Recommended Course Background: One semester of Introductory Chemistry (AS.030.101).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Remote Sensing of the Environment
AS.270.318 (01)

This course is an introduction to the use of remote sensing technology to study Earth’s physical and biochemical processes. Topics covered include remote sensing of the atmosphere, land and oceans, as well as remote sensing as a tool for policy makers. Also offered as 270.618

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/10
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Sedimentary Geology
AS.270.350 (01)

Sedimentary rocks are the historical records of the Earth, documenting climate change, mass extinctions, and the evolution of life. This course will provide an introduction to sedimentary processes and sedimentary rocks. Focus is placed on linking physical observations to the ancient environments in which sedimentary rocks once formed. Fundamental tools for interpreting the sedimentary rock record, such as depositional models, geochronology, and chemostratigraphy will be reviewed. Two 1-day weekend field trips will occur over the course of the semester. There will also be weekly 1-hour labs. Lab and field trip times will be determined in the first week of class. Graduate and advanced undergraduate level. Recommended Course Background: AS.270.220 or instructor permission.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshwater Systems Lab
AS.270.337 (01)

A hands-on investigation of the water quality, hydrology, geomorphology, and aquatic ecology of streams and other freshwater bodies. Includes field trips to water-related facilities such as drinking water and wastewater treatment plants.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshwater Systems
AS.270.336 (01)

A study of streams, lakes, and groundwater with a focus on aspects of water quality, hydrology, geomorphology, and aquatic ecology that are relevant to human impacts on freshwater systems. US environmental policies and water resource management agencies will also be examined in the context of issues such as dams, cattle grazing, climate change, and water allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI

Seminar in Regional Field Geology
AS.270.380 (01)

Introduction to the regional geology and geological history of the Appalachian system (from Alabama to Newfoundland). Key papers on regional bedrock geology and Mesoproterozoic through Phanerozoic tectonics are reviewed in weekly seminar classes. Two three-day field trips are made on weekends negotiated at the beginning of the semester. Fieldwork will be designed with student input to test ideas and models from the literature. Techniques in sedimentary, metamorphic, igneous and structural field geology are introduced and developed in the field. Recommended course background: AS.270.220 and AS.270.221, or instructor permission.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Mineral Physics Recitation
AS.270.333 (01)

This course is designed for undergraduate students interested in pursuing geophysics research in the topics of solid state physics or inorganic chemistry. It will consist of a weekly seminar paired with a separate paper reading+discussion group, covering a range of topics on the frontiers of mineral physics. Themes rotate each semester, and Fall 2018 will be paired with the Mineralogy Lecture Series on Modeling and Experimental challenges in Cosmochemistry. Recommended Course Background: Relevant coursework such as Mineralogy or equivalent in other department, and instructor permission.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 4/7
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planets, Life and the Universe
AS.270.335 (01)

This multidisciplinary course explores the origins of life, planets’ formation, Earth's evolution, extrasolar planets, habitable zones, life in extreme environments, the search for life in the Universe, space missions, and planetary protection. Co-listed with AS.020.334, AS.020.616 and AS.171.333

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Closed
  • Seats Available: 5/19
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL

Exploring Nature
AS.271.302 (01)

This course integrates environmental media analysis and production with weekly outdoor excursions. Environmental media increasingly structures our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Students will survey a range of authors, photographers and filmmakers that have written about or documented nature and environmental issues. Field trips to Baltimore's parks and green spaces will encourage students to discover their own sense of place and environmental worldview through careful exploration, observation and reflection. Using a mixed media journal, students will reflect on their experiences, perspectives, and insights. A background in photography or film is not required.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Earth and Planetary Fluids
AS.270.425 (01)

An introductory course on the properties, flow, and transport characteristics of fluids throughout the Earth and planets. Topics covered include: constitutive relationships, fluid rheology, hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, low Reynolds number flow, porous media, waves, stratified and rotating fluids, plus heat, mass, and tracer transport. Illustrative examples and problems are drawn from the atmosphere, ocean, crust, mantle, and core of the Earth and other Planets. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Recommended Course Background: Basic Physics, Calculus, and familiarity with ordinary differential equations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 15/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Atmospheric Science
AS.270.379 (01)

A survey of core topics in atmospheric science, including dynamics, thermodynamics, radiative transfer, and chemistry. The course addresses both basic principles and applications to weather and climate.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.270.495 (01)

Preparation of a substantial thesis based upon independent student research, supervised by at least one faculty member in Earth and Planetary Sciences. Open to Sr. departmental majors only. Required for department honors.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.270.221 (01)The Dynamic Earth LaboratoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSmith, Emmy, Viete, Daniel ROlin 204GECS-SCI
AS.270.305 (01)Energy Resources in the Modern WorldWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMBurgess, JerryOlin 304
AS.270.111 (01)Freshman Seminar: The Story of EarthM 3:00PM - 4:00PMSverjensky, DimitriOlin 346
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, XinKrieger 108GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.302 (01)Aqueous GeochemistryMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMSverjensky, DimitriOlin 346
AS.270.307 (01)Geoscience ModelingTTh 1:30PM - 3:30PMHaine, ThomasOlin 145ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.125 (01)People and the Earth: The Science Behind Our InteractionsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMKelly, Rebecca EHodson 313
AS.270.220 (01)The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to GeologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSmith, Emmy, Viete, Daniel ROlin 204GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.103 (01)Introduction to Global Environmental ChangeMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMSzlavecz, Katalin, Waugh, DarrynOlin 305ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.326 (01)CosmochemistryMW 3:00PM - 4:15PM, F 1:30PM - 4:00PMBeck, Andrew, Wicks, June KOlin 247
AS.270.328 (01)Planetary Exploration: Techniques and Data AnalysisTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMYu, XintingOlin 204
AS.270.318 (01)Remote Sensing of the EnvironmentMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMLewis, Kevin, Zaitchik, BenjaminKrieger 108ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.350 (01)Sedimentary GeologyTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGomes, Maya L, Lewis, KevinOlin 204
AS.270.337 (01)Freshwater Systems LabW 1:30PM - 4:20PMKelly, Rebecca EOlin 347
AS.270.336 (01)Freshwater SystemsTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMKelly, Rebecca EOlin 304GECS-SCI
AS.270.380 (01)Seminar in Regional Field GeologyM 4:00PM - 5:00PMSmith, Emmy, Viete, Daniel ROlin 346
AS.270.333 (01)Mineral Physics RecitationT 6:00PM - 7:00PM, W 4:30PM - 5:30PMWicks, June K 
AS.270.335 (01)Planets, Life and the UniverseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDiruggiero, JocelyneMudd 100BIOL-UL
AS.271.302 (01)Exploring NatureT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304GECS-SOCSCI
AS.270.425 (01)Earth and Planetary FluidsStaff, Stanley, Sabine 
AS.270.379 (01)Atmospheric ScienceTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWaugh, Darryn, Zaitchik, BenjaminOlin 304
AS.270.495 (01)Senior ThesisGnanadesikan, Anand 

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another pogram, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Population/Community Ecology
AS.270.308 (01)

This course explores the distribution and abundance of organisms and their interactions. Topics include dynamics and regulation of populations, population interactions (competition, predation, mutualism, parasitism, herbivory), biodiversity, organization of equilibrium and non-equilibrium communities, energy flow, and nutrient cycles in ecosystems. Field trip included. Students who have not taken one of the prerequisites may register with the permission of the instructor.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/45
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introductory Oceanography
AS.270.325 (01)

This class is an introduction to a wide range of physical, chemical, and biological phenomena in the world’s oceans. Underlying basic principles are exposed wherever possible. Topics covered include: seawater, waves, tides, ocean circulation, chemical oceanography, biogeochemical ocean processes, and remote sensing of the oceans. Recommended Course Background: freshman Physics, Chemistry, Calculus through ordinary differential equations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Mammalian Evolution
AS.270.312 (01)

An introduction to the evolutionary history and diversity of mammals, with emphasis on the first half of the Cenozoic - the beginning of the Age of Mammals. The course will focus primarily on the adaptive radiation of mammals (including our own order primates) that followed the extinction of the dinosaurs, exploring the origins and relationships of the major groups of mammals as well as the anatomical and ecological reasons for their success. Lectures will be supplemented with relevant fossils and recent specimens.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Environmental Poisons
AS.270.113 (01)

An exploration of the occurrence and potential effects of poisons in the environment, from naturally occurring ones such as arsenic to those that may be introduced by mankind such as nuclear waste.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 1/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Guided Tour: The Planets
AS.270.114 (01)

An introduction to planetary science and planetary exploration primarily for non-science majors. A survey of concepts from astronomy, chemistry, geology, and physics applied to the study of the solar system.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 46/110
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/24
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Oceans & Atmospheres
AS.270.224 (01)

A broad survey of the Earth’s oceans and atmospheres, and their role in the environment and climate. Topics covered include waves, tides, ocean and atmosphere circulation, weather systems, tornadoes and hurricanes, El Niño, and climate change. For science and engineering majors

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/32
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI

Soil Ecology
AS.270.332 (01)

The course introduces basic aspects of cycles and flows in the soil ecosystem, and provides students with an overview of the higher groups of soil organisms. Laboratory and field surveying methods are also covered.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshman Seminar: Sustainable + Non-Sustainable Resources
AS.270.110 (01)

An introduction to the important resources involved in the origin and production of oil, natural gas, coal, cement, metals and geothermal fluids.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Mineral Physics Recitation
AS.270.333 (01)

This course is designed for undergraduate students interested in pursuing geophysics research in the topics of solid state physics or inorganic chemistry. It will consist of a weekly seminar paired with a separate paper reading+discussion group, covering a range of topics on the frontiers of mineral physics. Themes rotate each semester, and Fall 2018 will be paired with the Mineralogy Lecture Series on Modeling and Experimental challenges in Cosmochemistry. Recommended Course Background: Relevant coursework such as Mineralogy or equivalent in other department, and instructor permission.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Canceled
  • Seats Available: 10/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Topics in Mineralogy
AS.270.339 (01)

This semester, join HEMI’s Designer in residence, and MICA professor Jenna Frye, in a modified version of her popular experimental fabrication course, EPIC FAIL. Discover how thinking with your hands, embracing risk and failure and playful exploration with educational toys, can invigorate your research in mineralogy and deepen your understanding of crystallography visualization. This course is designed as a hands-on, deeply collaborative workshop, where we will investigate the role of creative fabrication technology and invention as it relates to communicating scientific research to outside audiences. Together we will make, tinker and fail our way to improved visualization and presentation strategies so that others may more fully access the complexities in our work. Topics in Mineralogy is a special topics course that rotates in subject and may be taken multiple times for credit. This course is designed for those interested in mineralogy, and we recommend concurrent enrollment in Planetary Interiors, Space Weathering, and/or Advanced Mineralogy seminar.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/12
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Geodynamics Seminar
AS.270.361 (01)

Seminar class on the dynamics of subduction and accretionary orogenesis. Weekly readings discussed in class. Focus will be broad and process-based. Topics in subduction may include: (1) modes of global subduction through Earth history; (2) models of forced/triggered v. spontaneous subduction initiation; (3) arc development and implications for growth of continents; (4) subduction zone rollback and arc migration, and (5) subducted slab breakoff and tearing. Topics in accretionary orogenesis may include: (1) stress state of the overriding plate; (2) tectonic mode switches (shortening to extension and vice versa), and (3) length and time scales of the thermal manifestations of accretionary orogenesis.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Isotope Geochemistry
AS.270.331 (01)

Introduction to stable isotope and radioisotope geochemistry. Isotope measurements are used to probe fundamental questions in the Earth and environmental sciences because they can be used to extract information about the timing of and/or chemical, physical, and biological processes associated with the formation of geomaterials. The first half of the course focuses on light isotope systems (O, C, S, etc.) and low-temperature applications, including: (1) tracing sources and sinks of fluids, sediments, biological materials, and contaminants, (2) studying rates and mechanisms of biochemical reactions, and (3) paleoenvironmental reconstructions. The second half of the course focuses on heavier isotope systems and high-temperature applications, including: (1) methods for dating of rocks and geologic processes using long-half-life radioisotopes, including the various isotope systems available and their applicability, and (2) isotope fractionation at high temperatures and the utility of radioisotope and novel stable isotope geochemistry for interrogating processes influencing the crust and mantle. Biweekly lab classes (scheduled in first week) will allow students to become familiar with principles of isotope measurements and interpretations. Mid-term and final exams. Recommended course background: AS.270.220 and AS.270.221, or instructor permission.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/16
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Climate Change: Science & Policy
AS.271.360 (01)

Prereq: 270.103 or permission of instructor. This course will investigate the policy and scientific debate over global warming. It will review the current state of scientific knowledge about climate change, examine the potential impacts and implications of climate change, explore our options for responding to climate change, and discuss the present political debate over global warming.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 8/50
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, INST-IR

Society and Nature Conflicts: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Studying Environmental Problems Over Time
AS.271.345 (01)

In this seminar students will read seminal pieces in the field of socio-environmental research. Socio-environmental research recognizes that society and nature inherently interact in such a way that they affect and change one-another - it is not only that society affects the nature or that nature only affects society. Solving environmental problems necessitates understanding this duality and thus an interdisciplinary background. Assigned readings will span early from thinkers on environmental problems (Before 1900) to current approaches to studying and solving environmental problems.It is aimed at upper level undergraduates and graduate students.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Energy and Politics
AS.271.405 (01)

In the 21st century, energy supply and consumption are critical subjects for international politics, social development, and the future of the environment. Policies that determine energy supply and consumption come to being in complex institutional, national, and international contexts. This course will equip students with the necessary background to analyze energy policy issues and contribute to them in a meaningful manner. It also involves examination of wide-ranging debates over the switch to renewables, the use of unconventional energy sources, and the environmental consequences of energy choices.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/30
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Space Weathering
AS.270.406 (01)

This course will introduce and explore multiple topics of Space Weathering - the interaction of solar system bodies with the space environment. Through a combination of lecture, reading, research, and discussion the course will explore physical and chemical processes of solar and cosmic radiation and particles, micrometeorites, etc., on the surfaces of planets. We will also explore interaction of the space environment with planetary magnetic fields and atmospheres, and with non-planetary materials (such as spacecraft, and astronauts).

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 15/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Special Topics in Environmental Studies
AS.271.305 (01)

Environmental Policy in the Age of Trump. This course will analyze the effects of the current administration’s actions on environmental issues by assessing the policies in question and estimating the potential impacts on climate change, human health, and ecology. Policies that have been overturned or are under review represent a number of environmental issues, including climate change and greenhouse gas emissions, offshore drilling, national monuments, mining pollution, toxic discharge into public waterways, the development of oil pipelines, public land use planning, coal leases, a harmful insecticide, hunting in wildlife refuges, airborne mercury emissions, protection of tributaries and wetlands under the Clean Water Act, energy and fuel-efficiency standards, and resource extraction from federal lands. Students will examine the historical roles environmental organizations and government agencies have played in advocating for, creating and enforcing U.S. environmental policy and will discuss the future roles of these actors and other stakeholders in implementing effective environmental policy

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI

Introduction to Sustainability
AS.271.107 (01)

Humans are having such a massive impact on Earth systems that some call this the Anthropocene epoch. Should we consider this state of affairs progress or catastrophe? How to we find a sustainable path to the future? This course provides an interdisciplinary introduction to the principles and practice of sustainability, exploring such issues as population, pollution, energy and natural resources, biodiversity, food, justice, and climate change through the lens of systems thinking. Course open to freshmen, sophomores, and juniors. Seniors by instructor permission only.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 18/75
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Senior Thesis
AS.270.496 (01)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planetary Interiors
AS.270.404 (01)

This course investigates the physical processes occurring in planetary interiors. Topics include formation and differentiation of planetary bodies, planetary structure, thermal evolution, convection, and dynamo generation of magnetic fields. Standard remote sensing methods used to investigate planetary interiors and results from recent planetary satellite missions will also be discussed. Recommended: Knowledge of vector calculus, PDEs and introductory physics.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Water, Energy, and Food
AS.271.402 (01)

The water, energy and food (WEF) nexus is a topic of growing interest in the research and policy communities. This course will survey WEF concepts and principles, introduce tools of analysis, and engage students in case studies of critical WEF issues in the United States and internationally.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 10/20
  • PosTag(s): INST-IR

Environmental Policymaking and Policy Analysis
AS.271.403 (01)

This course provides students with a broad introduction to US environmental policymaking and policy analysis. Included are a historical perspective as well as an analysis of future policymaking strategies. Students examine the political and legal framework, become familiar with precedent-setting statutes such as NEPA, RCRA, and the Clean Air and Clean Water Acts, and study models for environmental policy analysis. Cost benefit studies, the limits of science in policymaking, and the impact of environmental policies on society are important aspects of this course. A comparison of national and international policymaking is designed to provide students with the proper perspective. This course is taught in conjunction with an identical graduate course. All students will be expected to perform at a graduate level.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/21
  • PosTag(s): INST-AP, INST-CP

Seminar in Field Geology
AS.270.381 (01)

Field experience is an integral part of a geology student’s education. During this course, students will spend over a week outdoors, learning to make observations that can be used to interpret the geologic history and structure of natural environments. This course is a spring break field course that will focus on different topics each year. For Spring 2019, the focus of the trip will be on applying concepts and techniques covered in Dynamic Earth (AS.270.220/1), Sedimentary Geology (AS.270.350), and Earth History (AS.270.303). Students will also learn about the different tectonic events that have shaped the landscape that we see today in the western United States. The class is designed for upper level E&PS majors and first or second year E&PS graduate students. For logistical reasons, this class is capped at 10 students. Preference will be given to E&PS majors. Students will be camping during the field course and should be prepared to be hiking outside all day. In the case that obtaining personal field supplies (e.g., hiking boots, sleeping bags) is not possible through Homewood student affairs gear rentals and/or is a financial hardship, please contact the instructor. Any communication about this will be kept confidential. Mandatory class field trip: 9-day field trip to Esmeralda County, NV over spring break (3/16/18-3/24/18).

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/6
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Environmental Ethics
AS.271.401 (01)

Environmental Ethics is a philosophical discipline that examines the moral relationship between humans and the natural environment. For individuals and societies, it can help structure our experience of nature, environmental problems, human-environmental relations, and ecological awareness. Beginning with a comprehensive analysis of their own values, students will explore complex ethical questions, philosophical paradigms and real-life case studies through readings, films and seminar discussions. Traditional ethical theories, including consequentialism, deontology, and virtue ethics will be examined and applied. Environmental moral worldviews, ranging from anthropocentric to ecocentric perspectives, will be critically evaluated. Organized debates will help students strengthen their ability to deconstruct and assess ethical arguments and to communicate viewpoints rooted in ethical principles. Students will apply ethical reasoning skills to an examination of contemporary environmental issues including, among others, biodiversity conservation, environmental justice, climate change, and overpopulation. Students will also develop, defend and apply their own personal environmental ethical framework. A basic understanding of modern environmental history and contemporary environmental issues is required. Prior experience with philosophy and ethics is not required.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, INST-PT

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.270.308 (01)Population/Community EcologyTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMAvolio, Meghan LynnOlin 247
AS.270.325 (01)Introductory OceanographyMWF 3:00PM - 3:50PMGnanadesikan, Anand, Haine, ThomasOlin 204
AS.270.312 (01)Mammalian EvolutionTTh 9:00AM - 10:15AMCooke, SiobhanMaryland 104
AS.270.113 (01)Freshman Seminar: Environmental PoisonsW 3:00PM - 4:00PMSverjensky, DimitriOlin 346
AS.270.114 (01)Guided Tour: The PlanetsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStanley, SabineOlin 305
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKelly, Rebecca EKrieger 108ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.224 (01)Oceans & AtmospheresMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMHaine, Thomas, Waugh, DarrynOlin 304GECS-SCI
AS.270.332 (01)Soil EcologyMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMSzlavecz, KatalinOlin 203
AS.270.110 (01)Freshman Seminar: Sustainable + Non-Sustainable ResourcesM 3:00PM - 4:00PMSverjensky, DimitriOlin 346
AS.270.333 (01)Mineral Physics RecitationT 6:00PM - 7:00PMWicks, June K 
AS.270.339 (01)Topics in MineralogyT 1:30PM - 4:30PMWicks, June K 
AS.270.361 (01)Geodynamics SeminarM 4:00PM - 5:00PMViete, Daniel ROlin 346
AS.270.331 (01)Isotope GeochemistryTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AM, W 4:00PM - 5:00PMGomes, Maya L, Viete, Daniel ROlin 347
AS.271.360 (01)Climate Change: Science & PolicyTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMWaugh, Darryn, Zaitchik, BenjaminOlin 305GECS-SCI, INST-IR
AS.271.345 (01)Society and Nature Conflicts: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Studying Environmental Problems Over TimeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMAvolio, Meghan Lynn 
AS.271.405 (01)Energy and PoliticsTTh 12:00PM - 1:15PMOzden-schilling, CanayOlin 304INST-IR
AS.270.406 (01)Space WeatheringIzenberg, Noam, Wicks, June K 
AS.271.305 (01)Special Topics in Environmental StudiesTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304GECS-SOCSCI
AS.271.107 (01)Introduction to SustainabilityMW 12:00PM - 1:15PMKelly, Rebecca EOlin 305
AS.270.496 (01)Senior ThesisGnanadesikan, Anand 
AS.270.404 (01)Planetary InteriorsMWF 1:30PM - 2:20PMStanley, Sabine, Wicks, June KOlin 145
AS.271.402 (01)Water, Energy, and FoodM 1:30PM - 4:00PMZaitchik, BenjaminOlin 145INST-IR
AS.271.403 (01)Environmental Policymaking and Policy AnalysisT 6:00PM - 8:45PMMaldonado, JomarOlin 304INST-AP, INST-CP
AS.270.381 (01)Seminar in Field GeologyT 4:00PM - 5:00PMSmith, Emmy 
AS.271.401 (01)Environmental EthicsT 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304GECS-SOCSCI, INST-PT