Undergraduate Courses

To see a complete list of courses offered and their descriptions, visit the online course catalog.

The courses listed below are provided by Student Information Services (SIS). This listing provides a snapshot of immediately available courses within this department and may not be complete. Course registration information can be found at https://sis.jhu.edu/classes.

Column one has the course number and section. Other columns show the course title, days offered, instructor's name, room number, if the course is cross-referenced with another program, and a option to view additional course information in a pop-up window.

Mineralogy
AS.270.222 (01)

An introduction to the properties, occurrence, and origin of the basic constituents of the Earth, including minerals and rocks. Introductory training in the recognition of minerals and rocks in the laboratory and the field.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planets, Life and the Universe
AS.020.334 (01)

This multidisciplinary course explores the origins of life, planet formation, Earth's evolution, extrasolar planets, habitable zones, life in extreme environments, the search for life in the Universe, space missions, and planetary protection. Recommended Course Background: Three upper level (300+) courses in sciences (Biophysics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Math, or Computer Science) Co-listed with AS.020.616

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/30
  • PosTag(s): BIOL-UL, BEHB-SOCSCI

Introduction to Global Environmental Change
AS.270.103 (01)

An introduction to the science behind global environmental issues. Earth systems, biogeochemical cycles, and the interrelationships between the living and nonliving world are explored, along with applications to climate change, biodiversity loss, and other issues of global significance.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 48/110
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Our Moon From Imagination to Exploration
AS.270.127 (01)

People imagined going to the Moon long before Neil Armstrong took those famous steps. Works such as Jules Verne’s 1865 book De la terre à la lune (From the Earth to the Moon) and Georges Méliès’s 1902 movie Le Voyage dans la Lune (A Trip to the Moon) served to inspire later exploration of the Moon in the second half of the 20th century. In 1959, Luna 2 became the first spacecraft to visit the Moon and since then a number of robotic and human missions have successfully explored the Moon. Analyzing data from those missions has led to a detailed scientific understanding of the Moon, yet certain fundamental questions remain unresolved. This calls for future exploration of the Moon. To be active participants of future exploration of the Moon, students in this course will understand the culture, history, engineering, and science of the Moon.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to Geology
AS.270.220 (01)

Basic concepts in geology, including plate tectonics; Earth’s internal structure; geologic time; minerals; formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks; development of faults, folds and earthquakes; geomagnetism. Corequisite (for EPS Majors): AS.270.221; optional for others. The course is introductory and open to undergraduates at all levels; freshmen are encouraged to enroll.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/30
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial Analysis
AS.270.205 (01)

The course provides a broad introduction to the principles and practice of Geographic Information Systems (GIS) and related tools of Geospatial Analysis. Topics will include history of GIS, GIS data structures, data acquisition and merging, database management, spatial analysis, and GIS applications. In addition, students will get hands-on experience working with GIS software.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 14/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE

The Dynamic Earth Laboratory
AS.270.221 (01)

This course is a hands-on learning experience for introductory geological concepts and techniques using geological tools, such as mineral/rock samples, microscopes, and maps. Field trips are its essential part. The course is open to undergraduates at all levels; freshmen who wish to get their hands (and boots) dirty are encouraged to enroll.

  • Credits: 2.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/20
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI

Our Moon From Imagination to Exploration
AS.270.127 (02)

People imagined going to the Moon long before Neil Armstrong took those famous steps. Works such as Jules Verne’s 1865 book De la terre à la lune (From the Earth to the Moon) and Georges Méliès’s 1902 movie Le Voyage dans la Lune (A Trip to the Moon) served to inspire later exploration of the Moon in the second half of the 20th century. In 1959, Luna 2 became the first spacecraft to visit the Moon and since then a number of robotic and human missions have successfully explored the Moon. Analyzing data from those missions has led to a detailed scientific understanding of the Moon, yet certain fundamental questions remain unresolved. This calls for future exploration of the Moon. To be active participants of future exploration of the Moon, students in this course will understand the culture, history, engineering, and science of the Moon.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Lower Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 11/18
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Earth History
AS.270.303 (01)

This course will explore the evolution of life in the context of environmental, ecological, and geological changes to the Earth surface system. The goal of the class is to provide students with an understanding of how geological and paleontological records provide insight into the origin(s) of life, oxygenation of the atmosphere, the evolution of multicellularity, evolutionary radiations and extinctions, and modern global change.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Astrobiology: Chemical Evolution of Life on Earth and Beyond
AS.270.334 (01)

Have you wondered how life began on Earth or if we are alone in the Universe? This course will explore the prebiotic chemistry and origin of life on Earth, then move on to Mars, icy bodies (Europa, Titan, Enceladus) and newly-found “habitable” exoplanets. Students in this course will learn state-of-the-art methods and techniques used to characterize habitable conditions and to detect life. This course will deepen understanding of the current developments and ongoing discoveries in field of astrobiology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 3/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Energy Resources in the Modern World
AS.270.305 (01)

This in-depth survey will inform students on the non-renewable and renewable energy resources of the world and the future prospects. Topics include petroleum, natural gas, coal, nuclear, hydroelectric, geothermal, solar, wind, biomass, and ocean energy. Global production, distribution, usage, and impacts of these resources will be discussed.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 7/20
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Ecocinema: Framing Italy's Environmental Crises
AS.211.327 (01)

Over the past decade, growing numbers of filmmakers in Italy have addressed ecological crises in their work. This class takes an eco-critical approach to contemporary Italian cinema, examining a body of compelling place-centered stories that deal with local and global issues. Defining the scope of eco-cinema and the ways we can interrogate films as ecological texts, we shall screen earth-centered films that raise consciousness about the consequences of human manipulation of the natural world; the complicity of industry, government, and organized crime in creating environmental crises; and the effects of economic and social malaise. Screenings include iconic films such as Michelangelo Antonioni’s Red Desert (1963), more recent, critically acclaimed films such as Matteo Garrone’s Gomorrah (2008), Alice Rohrwacher’s Happy as Lazzaro (2018), and many others.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/12
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL

Earth and Planetary Fluids
AS.270.425 (01)

An introductory course on the properties, flow, and transport characteristics of fluids throughout the Earth and planets. Topics covered include: constitutive relationships, fluid rheology, hydrostatics, dimensional analysis, low Reynolds number flow, porous media, waves, stratified and rotating fluids, plus heat, mass, and tracer transport. Illustrative examples and problems are drawn from the atmosphere, ocean, crust, mantle, and core of the Earth and other Planets. Open to graduate and advanced undergraduate students. Recommended Course Background: Basic Physics, Calculus, and familiarity with ordinary differential equations.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/12
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Sustainable Food Systems
AS.271.304 (01)

Where does your food come from? What impact does food production have on the environment and human societies? How can food systems become more sustainable as the human population increases? This seminar-style course examines the past, present, and future of agriculture, including topics such as the foodways of indigenous people, modern "factory farming" versus organic agriculture, genetically modified foods, and the interplay among science, economics, policy, and agriculture. Involves hands-on experiences.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/25
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Petrology Seminar
AS.270.408 (01)

Seminar class on recent developments in igneous and metamorphic petrology. Involves weekly readings on modern methods/understanding in petrogenesis and processes leading to mineral (re)crystallization; rock deformation; fluid transport in rocks; pressure and temperature estimates of rock formation, and rates/durations of thermotectonic processes in the lithosphere. Topics covered will cater to interests and learning goals of those who register in the class.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 6/10
  • PosTag(s): n/a

The Carbon Cycle: Past, Present and Future
AS.270.400 (01)

This course will explore how the carbon cycle shapes environmental conditions and influences other biogeochemical cycles through an investigation of the modern carbon cycle, major carbon cycle perturabtions in the geological record, and projections of future global change. The majority of the class will be structured as a reading seminar, but students will also develop an understanding of how to use quantitative models to evaluate patterns of change associated with both modern and ancient carbon cycle perturbations with implications for predicting future environmental changes. Recommended Prerequisites: AS.270.103 or AS.270.220 or AS.270.224

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/16
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE

Field Methods in Ecology
AS.270.338 (01)

This course will introduce student to methods used in field-based ecological research addressing population, community and ecosystem-level questions. Outdoor fieldwork is an essential part of the course. Field activities will center around the riparian ecosystem adjacent to the Homewood campus and on the urban ecology of the greater Baltimore region. Students will build skills in data collection, analysis, synthesis, and presentation. Basic statistical instruction in R will be taught to aid data analysis.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 2/10
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR, BEHB-BIOBEH

Exploring Nature
AS.271.302 (01)

This course integrates the analysis and production of environmental media with weekly outdoor excursions. Students will survey a range of authors, adventurers, journalists, scientists, photographers, acoustic ecologists and filmmakers that have explored the natural world and chronicled the history of human-environmental relations and environmental problems. Field trips to regional parks and green spaces will encourage students to discover their own sense of place, foster a deeper level of ecological awareness and construct personal environmental narratives through careful exploration, observation, documentation and reflection.

  • Credits: 4.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Waitlist Only
  • Seats Available: 0/12
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Research Design
AS.271.399 (01)

This course supports students in the design of their senior capstone project, including crafting a suitable research question, identifying appropriate methodologies, and writing a formal project proposal.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 24/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planets, Life and the Universe
AS.360.339 (01)

This multidisciplinary course explores the origins of life, planet formation, Earth's evolution, extrasolar planets, habitable zones, life in extreme environments, the search for life in the Universe, space missions, and planetary protection. Recommended Course Background: Three upper level (300+) courses in sciences (Biophysics, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Astronomy, Math, or Computer Science)

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 17/20
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Planetary Surface Processes
AS.270.410 (01)

This course explores processes that influence the evolution of planetary surfaces, including impact cratering, tectonics, volcanism, weathering, and sediment transport. These processes manifest themselves as structural deformation of planetary crusts due to loading by volcanoes, formation of craters by asteroid impacts, modification of surfaces by flowing landslides, rivers and glaciers, and the accumulation and transport of sand in dune fields on various planets. Emphasis is on the relationship to similar Earth processes, and the integrated geologic histories of the terrestrial planets, satellites, and asteroids. The focus will be on developing a physical understanding of these processes to interpret the surface characteristics and evolution of planets, satellites, asteroids, and comets from both qualitative assessments and quantitative measurements obtained from spacecraft data. A key component of the class will be the interpretation of these observations from recent and current planetary missions to the Moon, Mars, and other terrestrial bodies. Recommended Course Background: A sound knowledge of Calculus and Introductory Physics, and some prior knowledge of Earth and/or Planetary Science.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/19
  • PosTag(s): ARCH-RELATE

Senior Seminar
AS.271.499 (01)

This seminar explores topics related to career development and current events to support senior environmental majors as they transition to post-graduate life and work.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Freshwater Systems Lab
AS.270.337 (01)

A hands-on investigation of the water quality, hydrology, geomorphology, and aquatic ecology of streams and other freshwater bodies. Includes field trips to water-related facilities such as drinking water and wastewater treatment plants.

  • Credits: 1.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 4/10
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Freshwater Systems
AS.270.336 (01)

A study of streams, lakes, and groundwater with a focus on aspects of water quality, hydrology, geomorphology, and aquatic ecology that are relevant to human impacts on freshwater systems. US environmental policies and water resource management agencies will also be examined in the context of issues such as dams, cattle grazing, climate change, and water allocation.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 1/25
  • PosTag(s): GECS-SCI, BEHB-BIOBEH

Senior Capstone Experience
AS.271.496 (01)

This seminar will provide the academic space, time, and mentoring for students to integrate, synthesize and apply the knowledge and skills obtained through the ENVS curriculum into a tangible environmental project.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 13/25
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Present and Future Climate
AS.270.378 (01)

Intended for majors who are interested in the science that underlies the current debate on global warming, the focus is on recent observations one can glean from model simulations. Meets with AS.270.641. Recommended Course Background: AS.110.108-AS.110.109 and AS.171.101-AS.171.102

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 5/14
  • PosTag(s): ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR

Astrobiology: Chemical Evolution of Life on Earth and Beyond
AS.270.334 (02)

Have you wondered how life began on Earth or if we are alone in the Universe? This course will explore the prebiotic chemistry and origin of life on Earth, then move on to Mars, icy bodies (Europa, Titan, Enceladus) and newly-found “habitable” exoplanets. Students in this course will learn state-of-the-art methods and techniques used to characterize habitable conditions and to detect life. This course will deepen understanding of the current developments and ongoing discoveries in field of astrobiology.

  • Credits: 3.00
  • Level: Upper Level Undergraduate
  • Status: Open
  • Seats Available: 9/15
  • PosTag(s): n/a

Course # (Section) Title Day/Times Instructor Room PosTag(s) Info
AS.270.222 (01)MineralogyTTh 9:00AM - 10:00AM, M 9:00AM - 12:00PMWicks, June KOlin 206B
AS.020.334 (01)Planets, Life and the UniverseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDiruggiero, Jocelyne, Levin, Naomi E, Norman, ColinMudd 100BIOL-UL, BEHB-SOCSCI
AS.270.103 (01)Introduction to Global Environmental ChangeTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMGnanadesikan, Anand, Zaitchik, BenjaminOlin 305ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.127 (01)Our Moon From Imagination to ExplorationMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMPerera, VirangaOlin 145
AS.270.220 (01)The Dynamic Earth: An Introduction to GeologyTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMSmith, Emmy, Viete, Daniel ROlin 247GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.205 (01)Introduction to Geographic Information Systems and Geospatial AnalysisM 1:30PM - 4:00PMChen, XinKrieger 108GECS-SCI, ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.221 (01)The Dynamic Earth LaboratoryW 1:30PM - 4:00PMSmith, Emmy, Viete, Daniel ROlin 247GECS-SCI
AS.270.127 (02)Our Moon From Imagination to ExplorationMW 4:30PM - 5:45PMPerera, VirangaOlin 145
AS.270.303 (01)Earth HistoryTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMGomes, Maya LOlin 204ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.334 (01)Astrobiology: Chemical Evolution of Life on Earth and BeyondTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMHe, ChaoOlin 304
AS.270.305 (01)Energy Resources in the Modern WorldWF 1:30PM - 2:45PMBurgess, JerryOlin 304ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.211.327 (01)Ecocinema: Framing Italy's Environmental CrisesMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMDi Bianco, LauraGilman 277ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, INST-GLOBAL
AS.270.425 (01)Earth and Planetary FluidsTTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMStanley, SabineOlin 145ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.271.304 (01)Sustainable Food SystemsMW 3:00PM - 4:15PMKelly, Rebecca EOlin 304ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.408 (01)Petrology SeminarM 4:00PM - 5:00PMViete, Daniel ROlin 346
AS.270.400 (01)The Carbon Cycle: Past, Present and FutureTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMGomes, Maya L, Smith, EmmyOlin 347ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR, ARCH-RELATE
AS.270.338 (01)Field Methods in EcologyF 1:30PM - 4:20PMAvolio, Meghan Lynn, Szlavecz, KatalinOlin 247ARCH-RELATE, ENVS-MINOR, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.271.302 (01)Exploring NatureT 1:30PM - 4:30PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304GECS-SOCSCI, ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.271.399 (01)Research DesignMonopolis, Alexios Nicolaos 
AS.360.339 (01)Planets, Life and the UniverseMWF 11:00AM - 11:50AMDiruggiero, Jocelyne, Norman, ColinMudd 100
AS.270.410 (01)Planetary Surface ProcessesTTh 10:30AM - 11:45AMLewis, KevinOlin 204ARCH-RELATE
AS.271.499 (01)Senior SeminarTh 1:30PM - 2:45PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosOlin 304
AS.270.337 (01)Freshwater Systems LabT 1:30PM - 4:20PMKelly, Rebecca EOlin 347ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.336 (01)Freshwater SystemsMWF 10:00AM - 10:50AMKelly, Rebecca EOlin 304GECS-SCI, BEHB-BIOBEH
AS.271.496 (01)Senior Capstone ExperienceTh 1:30PM - 4:00PMMonopolis, Alexios NicolaosBloomberg 274
AS.270.378 (01)Present and Future ClimateMW 1:30PM - 2:45PMZaitchik, BenjaminOlin 204ENVS-MAJOR, ENVS-MINOR
AS.270.334 (02)Astrobiology: Chemical Evolution of Life on Earth and BeyondTTh 3:00PM - 4:15PMHe, ChaoOlin 145