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Congratulations to Our Graduates

On May 24, 2018 the Department had six PhD students graduate: Fang Huang, Eshwan Ramudu, Kirby Runyon, Alexi Russell, Hannah Susorney and Jordan Thomas. In addition, Masters Degrees were awarded to Sarah Moran and Andrew Annex. The Department also awarded Bachelor’s Degrees to the following students:, E&PS Majors Morgan Balster, Eric Chan, Erica Johnston, Sydney […]


E&PS Student Achievements

E&PS Graduate Student Sarah Moran has been awarded a 2018 NASA Earth and Space Sciences Graduate Fellowship in Astrophysics for her proposal entitled “Determining the Role of Hazes in the Atmospheres of Temperate Planets in M-Dwarf Systems.” This is a highly competitive fellowship program and in 2018 only 8 of the 177 proposals submitted were […]


Congratulations to our Undergraduates

The Johns Hopkins Department of Earth and Planetary Sciences congratulates five graduating seniors from the class of 2018 who completed honors theses. Eric Chan: A graduate of John Foster Dulles HS in Sugarland, TX Eric worked with Prof. Sarah Horst to examine the impact of changing carbon monoxide concentrations on the chemical composition of hazes. […]


Researchers simulate conditions inside ‘super- Earths’

Simulations offer insight into what previously had been limited to extrapolations and theoretical calculations By aiming intense X-ray beams at iron samples, scientists have discovered what may lie at the core of “super-Earths,” rocky planets triple the mass of Earth orbiting far-distant stars. Written by Jessica Ader.


The cosmic cocktail of exoplanet atmospheres

Sarah Hörst

Planetary scientist Sarah Hörst successfully replicates different forms of planetary haze—important models that will inform the study of exoplanets.


Alien atmospheres recreated on Earth

asmopheric haze

Researcher Dr. Sarah Hörst and her team have recreated the chemistry of atmospheres on distant planets for the first time in the lab. The study was published in Nature Astronomy this week.


Effects of climate change likely to be more deadly in poor African settlements

Conditions in crowded urban settlements in Africa make the effects of climate change worse, pushing temperatures to levels dangerous for children and the elderly in those areas, according to a new study led by a Johns Hopkins University scientist. Article written by Arthur Hirsch


Two Faculty Members Featured in New Film about Hurricanes

hurricane

Professor Anand Gnanadesikan and Assistant Professor Ciaran Harman are featured in, “Super Hurricanes: Inside Monster Storms.” The film, which comes after two of the most devastating hurricanes in decades, airs on the Science Channel at 9 p.m. EST on Friday, Sept. 22.


Cassini Spacecraft Takes its Final Dive

This morning, after two decades in space, NASA’s Cassini spacecraft ended an incredible journey of exploration. With the spacecraft’s fuel spent, operators deliberately plunged Cassini into Saturn—which it had orbited for 13 years —to make sure the planet’s moons remain pristine for future exploration. A small but significant piece of the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics […]


New EPS Faculty Members

Meghan Avolio earned her PhD in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology from Yale University and is a plant ecologist studying the mechanisms by which global change drivers, including urbanization, impact the diversity of plant populations and communities. Her research addresses the consequences of global change for individual plants up to entire ecosystem functioning. Meghan has joined us […]